Montgomeryshire Family History

  • Montgomeryshire Baptisms
    Discover your Welsh ancestors through the Montgomeryshire Baptisms. Through these records, find out your ancestor’s parents’ names, their residence and their occupations. The records document baptismal information centuries before civil registration of births in Wales.
  • Montgomeryshire Marriages and Banns
    Discover if your ancestors got married in the historic Welsh county of Montgomeryshire by searching through thousands of marriage and banns records. You may find out your ancestor’s wedding date, parish, occupation and father’s name.
  • Montgomeryshire Burials
    Explore the Montgomeryshire Burials and reveal your Welsh relatives. Civil registration of burials did not start until 1837. You will discover your ancestor’s burial location, burial date and another ancestral name for your family tree.
  • Montgomeryshire Memorial Inscriptions
    Discover your ancestor’s memorial inscriptions from Montgomeryshire, Wales. Learn where your ancestor was buried as well as your ancestor’s birth and death years. Your ancestor’s memorial inscription may include such details as spouse’s name and date of death. Records span the years from 1577 to 2016.
  • Montgomeryshire Genealogical Society
    The Montgomeryshire Genealogical Society was founded in 1994 to provide a forum for people with family history interests in the historical county of Montgomeryshire and its borders. By 2019 it has published its 410th booklet.
  • Montgomeryshire Hearth Tax
    The hearth tax was levied between 1662 and 1689 but most surviving records date from 1662 to 1666 and 1669 to 1674. The basic principle was to tax householders, other than the poor, for each hearth they owned. In principle, therefore, the more hearths you owned, the more you paid. The surviving hearth tax returns include lists of chargeable and not chargeable householders with a note in each case of the number of hearths each possessed. The returns therefore have some of the characteristics of a census and, in national terms, are one of the nearest things to one before the 19th century.